The real reason I’m MGTOW

First things first, this motherfucker of a post has been sitting in drafts for months. I need to get this outta my system. Apologies if this isn’t the most articulate thing you’ve ever read…

…so I remember being just under 5 years old and hiding under the kitchen table with my sister after Saturday morning cartoons. We looked at each other with nervous smiles. Our parents were fighting again. If we hid, maybe we wouldn’t get hit. We could hear the yelling. Things breaking.

It didn’t happen like the video above, but it didn’t happen like the other stuff you see in the media where a controlling husband is trying to put his wife into place. shit, if you asked me, I woulda said they like to fight. I remember seeing a music video by Prince where his parents fought. But unlike me, he got to hop on a motorcycle with a pretty lady and leave that aweful situation

Now, the “enlightened” among you will say, “How can you trust the memory of a small child?”

My response is Fuck You, I was there…

It didn’t happen the way it’s officially stated….

They were BOTH violent…

They were both selfish parents…

According to TGMP and the psychological community at large, I have the perfect background to become an “abuser.”

Wanna know something, as far as my immediate family, I’m the only one who hasn’t been in an abusive relationship…

MGTOW has saved me spiritually, emotionally and physically (not to mention legally.)

To putt it succinctly, MGTOW has been my survival.

Fuck you to a world that hasn’t given me better and doesn’t want better for me anyways…

Fuck you to a movement that purports to support men but then has some ideologue questioning your masculinity when you refuse to do things his way…

Fuck you to a hate movement that pretends to be a social justice movement.

And FUCK YOU to bullies like David Futrelle and Hugo Schwyzer who willingly throw men like me under the bus even though we haven’t committed crimes but we’re expected to do the time.

6 thoughts on “The real reason I’m MGTOW

  1. I’d have to look for some research to back this up, but I don’t think that you are more likely to be an abuser.

    My guess is that, if you were subject to an abusive home, you’d be more likely to view abuse as normal and therefore more likely to abuse others or accept abuse from others – as an adult.

    But you’d short-circuit this loop if you don’t view abuse as normal. For those who recognize the abuse and realize their childhoods were unhealthy – I don’t see why they’d be more likely to abuse. You recognize abuse and view it as wrong. Shouldn’t that make you less likely to abuse?

    1. “My guess is that, if you were subject to an abusive home, you’d be more likely to view abuse as normal and therefore more likely to abuse others or accept abuse from others – as an adult.”

      that’s closer to it. My fears isn’t so much that I’d find a good woman, then beat her silly after 2 drinks. It’s more that I’d get drawn into a relationship with an abusive woman and be too weak to leave because she was hot/the sex was good or would fight back and wind up in the legal justice system. The (limited) attention I do get from ladies IRL is all the Ms. Wrong’s.

      I was bullied growing up, I was seen as a “mark” or easy target by predatory types. After a point, I lost my fear of getting my ass kicked and got some reputation as a fighter even though I didn’t like it.

  2. Let me lay out a premise for you, and you can ask any professional psychology folk you know for a clarification/correction:

    You said that your mother was (is?) a selfish, violent woman. You grew up conditioned to being around a selfish, violent woman, that this is normal. Maybe that is what is leading you to attention from Ms. Wrong; you’re not just finding her, you’re actively searching her out.

  3. After a point, I lost my fear of getting my ass kicked and got some reputation as a fighter even though I didn’t like it.(Stoner)

    I remember my first thought after the punch. “Mark hits a lot harder than you do”. After that the kid was toast and a bully was born. Best and worst thing to happen to me, to know how to fight. Took a lot of years to get that out of my system, in truth, some days Im still working on it.

    “Slowly all the roles we act out become our identity. And in the end we are what we pretend to be.”

    Jerry Cantrell

  4. I just watched “Good Will Hunting” for the umpteenth time. Other than the brains I can relate to him in many ways. A sneaky suspicion many of us could.

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